Raw Vegan Vs. Vegan

People who follow a vegan diet eat only plant foods. All meats and other animal products, including milk and eggs, are off-limits. People choose a vegan diet for health, ethical reasons or religious beliefs. Some vegans restrict their diets even further by choosing to eat only raw foods.

Pros of Raw Food

  • Focuses on lots of fresh fruits and vegetables
  • Promotes weight loss and detoxification (low in calories, fat, and sodium)
  • High in fiber

Cons of Raw Food

  • Tends to be less savory (doesn’t taste as good as cooked food options)
  • Virtually impossible to eat out, so it requires continuous meal preparation
  • Risk of contamination from uncooked food.

Pros of Cooked Food

  • Greater nutrient diversity
  • More antioxidants, cartenoids, and ferulic acid from vegetables
  • More satisfying taste and sense of fullness

Cons of Cooked Food

  • Loss of some nutrients from high-heating temperatures
  • Loss of anti-cancer compounds and enzymes from heat
  • Time-consuming

Whether you choose to eat your fruits and vegetables raw or cooked, the important thing is that you’re eating them every day. Many people find cooked foods taste better, so they are more inclined to eat them after a little preparation.

 

Source: https://www.vegetarianbodybuilding.com/raw-food-vs-cooked/

VEGAN FOOD GROUPS

Vegetables Group

Do you have ANY idea just how good veggies are for you? They’re one of the most important foods you can eat. They are low-calorie and full of nutrients that your body needs daily.

Fortified Soymilk or Nut milk Group

This is the Vegan Calcium group. As long as you’re eating a well-balanced diet, it’s difficult to NOT get the calcium you need. There are many other foods that provide Calcium as well.

Beans, Bean Alternates, Nuts & Seeds Group

  Vegans get plenty of protein from other sources other than meat. Beans are just a common staple for Vegans to go to for protein. Many other foods have protein as well.

 

Whole Grains, Breads, Rice, Pasta, Cereals Group

You’ll find many good whole grains to consume. Just remember to find out hoow many servings of whole grains you should eat on a daily basis, a list of grains for you to discover, and how to select, clean, soak, cook and flavor your grains to perfection.

 

Fruit Group

Learn which fruits MUST BE organic and which can be conventional. Also learn how to select and clean your fruit, fruit “Flavor Matches”, and nutritional information too.

 

Omegas, B12 and D Group

There are some very important nutrients we need to be sure to supplement with and you can learn about these in my such as omega 3’s and B12. We need to make sure we don’t leave out any important vitamins and nutrients when becoming Vegan.

 

Water!

Glass of waterLast but certainly not least is WATER!

Popular Vegan Substitutes

Dairy

Alternative milks: Almond, soy, rice or hemp milk.

Buttery spread: Look for non-hydrogenated versions, like Earth Balance.

Dairy-free cheese: Daiya melts

Cream cheese: Tofutti cream cheese.

Sour cream: Tofutti.

Soy yogurt: Good for probiotics.

Protein

Tofurkey: If you can’t live without a “roast.”

Field Roast products: Grain-based faux meat products, not too processed and unusually tasty.

Tofu: Silken for smoothies and puddings; medium or firm for cooking.

Tempeh: Soybean-based meat substitute.

Seitan: Meat substitute made from wheat gluten; great texture, great protein.

Frozen vegetable burgers: Making your own is better, but these are convenient in a pinch.

Edamame: Fresh (frozen) soy beans are a great high-protein snack or side.

Beans: Dried and home-cooked are cheap and the healthiest

Condiments

Mayonnaise: Vegenaise tastes most like traditional mayo, Spectrum is a bit sweeter.

Bragg Liquid Aminos: Liquid protein concentrate, delicious soy-sauce taste.

Sriracha: Or other favorite hot sauces.

Harissa: Tunisian hot pepper paste makes anything taste good.

Tahini: Sesame paste can be used as a condiment or in preparing Middle Eastern recipes.

Kimchi: Great source of probiotics if you don’t like soy yogurt.

Sauerkraut: A surprising source of health benefits.

Source: https://www.mnn.com/food/healthy-eating/stories/vegan-grocery-list-top-50-staples-for-a-meat-free-diet

Concerns about Becoming a Vegan

Vegan diets, when planned properly, are healthy and can even lower the risk of certain diseases, according to the American Dietetic Association. They can be appropriate for individuals in all stages of life, including infancy, childhood, pregnancy and lactation. It is important to note, however, that there is a risk of being deficient in certain nutrients if the vegan diet is not carefully planned. People who adhere to strict vegan diets are at risk for less than adequate intakes of protein, omega-3 fatty acids, iron, calcium, zinc, iodine and vitamins D and B-12.

Because animal foods such as meat, dairy, eggs, fish and fowl are among the best sources of protein, vegans can sometimes lack sufficient protein in their diets. The American Dietetic Association, however, believes that protein requirements can be met if a variety of plant proteins are consumed, such as peas, beans, ect.

Though vegan diets can lack sufficient amounts of omega-3 due to the restriction of omega-3-rich foods, including eggs, fish and other seafood. The omega-3 fatty acids found in animal sources can also be found in  plant foods rich in omega-3, such as flaxseed. Vegans can purchase soy milk and breakfast bars fortified with DHA, as well as DHA supplements. Sources containing DHA are sufficient for vegan diets.

Vitamin D is important for bone health, and low levels have been linked to reduced bone mass. Sunlight exposure is best source of vitamin D. Many people vegan or not lack vitamin D.  People who do not get regular sun exposure need to consume dietary vitamin D through either fortified foods or supplements, since vitamin D occurs naturally in very few foods. Vegan sources of vitamin D that are often fortified include soy milk, rice milk and orange juice.

Lack of vitamin B-12 is one of the biggest concerns with vegan diets, especially because vegan diets do not have it. Severe B-12 deficiencies can result in both anemia and dementia, notes Harvard Medical School. So, if you’re a vegan, be sure to consume B-12 fortified foods such as soy and rice beverages and breakfast cereals, or supplements.

In conclusion, a vegan diet, is like every other diet. It needs to be carefully planned out. We are not free to just eat whatever we please and be healthy. Vegan diets are and can be a successful way to have good lasting health.

Plant Based Vs. Vegan

 

Vegans abstain from eating any animal products. According to The Vegan Society, “Veganism is a way of living which seeks to exclude, as far as is possible and practicable, all forms of exploitation of, and cruelty to, animals for food, clothing or any other purpose. Which means that many vegans also don’t purchase leather goods. But it doesn’t necessarily mean they’re eating lots of whole foods plant-based meals. Vegans could get through life eating processed foods and skimping on their veggies just like anyone else. Think potato chips, (vegan-friendly) gummy candy, and even cookies. They are not good for you, but yet they are Vegan.

A whole foods plant-based diet, on the other hand, emphasizes eating whole fruits and vegetables, consuming lots of whole grains, and staying away from (or at least minimizing) the intake of animal products and processed foods for health reasons. That means that even vegan desserts made with refined sugar or bleached flour are out. It does not restrict their purchase of leather goods.

Vegetarian and Vegan Kids

Your child has come to you and tells you they want to be a Vegetarian or a Vegan. What do you do? As a parent, we listen first.

  • Ask and let them explain why it is they want to change the diet
  • Talk about any concerns you may have as far as any vitamin deficiency they may incur and how they may have to take a multi-vitamin to substitute any missing nutrition (vitamins B12, iron, calcium, etc….)
  • Support them and let them know you appreciate their effort. Once a week cook a vegetarian/vegan meal for the entire family
  • Always have foods available for them to maintain their  food choices (fresh fruits and vegetables)
  • Allow them to find and cook their own vegetarian/vegan meals

Last but not least, always keep the doors of communication open and make sure you and them are educated about veganism and vegetarianism.

SWITCH TO A PLANT BASED WAY OF LIFE

1. Learn More

Read and watch everything you can about eating vegan. Talk to vegans you know about how they transitioned, what challenges they had and how they overcame them, and what things they love most about their vegan lifestyle. Support yourself with knowledge—it works!

A recent survey of nearly 8,000 vegans found that more than 40 percent were inspired to go vegan after watching an educational video or movie, nearly 30 percent were motivated by an article, book or song lyric, and another 25 percent were encouraged to become vegan by a conversation with another person.

2. Veganize Your Current Meals

Choose some of your favorite meals that you cook on a regular basis for lunch or dinner, and then veganize them. A hamburger can become a grilled or sautéed portobello mushroom smothered with sautéed tomatoes and onions. You’ll be surprised at how easily you can make your most familiar meals vegan.

3. Find New Vegan Recipes

Make a habit of leisurely checking out vegan recipe sites once a week or so when you have some free time. That way, you’ll expand your awareness about the infinite variety of vegan dishes that exist, you’ll identify some favorite, go-to sites for mealtime inspiration, and you’ll train your brain to think vegan when it comes to food.

4. Keep a Stash

It’s a good idea to keep a stash of your favorite healthy snacks in your desk or the refrigerator at work, in your car, or in your purse or bag. These can include fruit, nuts, popcorn, baked chips and more. You’ll find they come in handy during those times when there’s no other vegan food available.

6. Enjoy the Transition

Celebrate the fact that you’re taking this life-changing step toward eating healthier. That alone is a tremendous achievement.

Source: https://www.nbcnews.com/news/nbcblk/world-vegan-day-6-tips-switching-plant-based-diet-n676281

Veganism

Vegans vs. Vegetarians

Vegetarian and vegan are two words that we have all heard of but most of us won’t really understand the difference. We know that it means vegetarian food or a vegan diet doesn’t contain eat red meat or any meat-based diet, but what is the difference between the two?

Introduction Veganism is a philosophy and compassionate lifestyle whose adherents seek to exclude the use of animals for food, clothing, or any other purpose. Vegans endeavor not to use or consume animal products of any kind. Vegetarianism is the practice of a diet that excludes meat (including game and slaughter by-products; fish, shellfish and other sea animals; and poultry). There are several variants of the diet, some of which also exclude eggs.
Diet Vegans do not consume meat, eggs, milk, honey or any food that is derived from animals. Do not eat meat or fish. Some do consume dairy and some vegetarians consume eggs. Lacto-vegetarian: eating dairy products. Ovo-vegetarian: eating eggs. Do not eat gelatin or other animal by products.
Products Do not use any animal derived products, e.g. fur, leather, wool, etc. Do not condone the use of animal testing. While vegetarians do not eat meat, most vegetarians do not mind using other animal-derived products, e.g. fur, leather, or wool.

 

Source: https://www.diffen.com/difference/Vegan_vs_Vegetarian,

 

 

BEING VEGAN AND LOSING WEIGHT

A vegan diet isn’t a guaranteed way to lose weight. You can very well eat processed chips, cereal, energy bars and pasta as the bulk of your diet and still be heavier than someone following an omnivorous diet consisting of lean meats and leafy greens. Long-term vegans, though, do tend to have less body fat and lower cholesterol than meat eaters, reported a study in Nutrition Research and Practice published in 2012. Vegans are successful at keeping a healthy body weight focus on eating whole foods, such as beans and legumes, fresh vegetables, and soy protein. To lose weight quickly, even as a vegan, you’ll still need to moderate your calorie intake and exercise.

Weight loss on any type of diet occurs when you eat fewer calories than you burn. A deficit of 3,500 calories leads to 1 pound lost. You create this deficit by cutting calories, exercising more or a combination of the two. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends not losing weight at a rate faster than about 2 pounds per week, or you’ll be less likely to keep it off. This may not fit your definition of “fast,” but it’s the most manageable and safest rate.

One of the benefits of a vegan diet is that you’re cutting out potentially high-calorie foods, such as fatty meats, poultry with the skin and processed meat. A vegan diet includes no animal flesh and sometimes no animal products, no eggs, and no dairy.  A vegan consumes mainly plant foods.

To lose weight quickly, you may need to limit certain snacks that are healthy and vegan, but can easily lead to overeating. A scant handful of nuts or two tablespoons of hummus fit into a vegan weight loss plan, but if they turn into a half- or full-cup serving, you’re better off resisting them altogether. Opt for a snack of plain, soy low-fat yogurt with berries, a piece of fresh fruit or cut-up vegetables, instead.

Stay away from fried vegan foods, including French fries and tempura vegetables. Don’t deprive yourself of fats altogether when trying to drop pounds, though. Just opt for healthy unsaturated versions by sprinkling a few seeds over your salad, tossing roast vegetables in a tablespoon of olive oil, or adding a tablespoon of chia seeds to your morning smoothie.

Just because a food item says it’s vegan doesn’t mean it’s low-calorie. Vegan cookies, cupcakes and pizza usually contain large numbers of calories and could undermine your results. Salads are excellent meal options, as long as you limit the amount of high-calorie toppings — including croutons, creamy dressing, cheese crumbles, dried fruit and candied nuts.