Misunderstood Vegans

  • Being lectured about how much protein you’re getting by someone who exclusively eats Stouffer’s lasagna. Thank you for your opinion, Jake, but please shut your mouth. Your proteinless dinner is falling out of it and I’d hate to see that go to waste.
  •  Having to hear someone’s self-righteous “Yeah, I tried being vegan for a while, but it didn’t work for me” story. I get that some people try being vegan for various reasons and then it doesn’t work out for various reasons, but I really don’t need to hear your passive-aggressive story about why my life is a lie.
  • When people get super self-conscious about eating around you because they worry you’ll judge them, when really you just want to quietly eat kale alongside them. I couldn’t care less about whether or not you’re eating eggs and honestly, I did not even notice you were eating eggs until you made it weird. 
  • When someone brings you something edible as a way of saying “thank you” but they didn’t know you were vegan and now you have this box of crap you can’t eat. The worst is when they want to eat the food item with you and you have to weigh the pros and cons of a chew-and-spit, or telling them you’re vegan and making them sad because you can’t eat their present. I usually say I just ate because any other reality is too awkward and heartbreaking for me. 
  • Having your relatives ask you if you’re “still doing that vegan thing.” Being vegan is not Carmen Electra’s Aerobic Striptease workout from 2004. Plus, I’ve been doing that “thing” since I was a teenager so it’s probably a done deal at this point.
  • Having to hear someone’s self-righteous “Yeah, I tried being vegan for a while, but it didn’t work for me” story. I get that some people try being vegan for various reasons and then it doesn’t work out for various reasons, but I really don’t need to hear your passive-aggressive story about why my life is a lie.
  • Source: https://www.cosmopolitan.com/sex-love/news/a50566/problems-only-vegans-understand/

Dangers of Entrepreneurship

1. Knowing better than the market. The entrepreneur fails to contend with the fact that their new product or service is succeeding elsewhere than their target market. In essence, the entrepreneur rejects unexpected, unplanned success because it rattles their belief that they’re in control.

2. Focusing on profits. Cash flow is the real name of the game, because growth-spurt companies need continual stoking with fresh money. Drucker says an entrepreneur should start planning the next round of financing six months before crunch time. Of course, few do-a failing Drucker attributes to financial illiteracy among most business people, not just fledgling entrepreneurs.

3. The management crisis. After about four years of normal, healthy expansion, a company usually outgrows its management base. The entrepreneur has gotten stretched to the max, and when things start to go haywire-as they invariably will-no one is available to take up the slack. Again, acting before a crisis is key. Twelve to 18 months before this bottleneck, the entrepreneur should gather those workers who show managerial promise and assign suitable roles. Then there’s enough time for them to learn their specialties, for the team to coalesce, and for the owner to identify and replace any wrong choices.

4. Loss of perspective. Once the company is up and running, a different type of danger loom. Focusing on his or her desires or needs, the entrepreneur neglects to make the needs of the business the highest priority. An entrepreneur needs to be honest in determining whether they have the skills or strengths the company needs at that time. If not, then it’s best to step aside or adjust one’s role.

Source: https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/39360